Travels

On the use of Flickr images in blogs

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A few days ago I had a delicate conversation in the flickr user forum; the well-known photo storage portal. I am frequent to look for photos on this page where people share their images among users to illustrate my articles when I lack an original photograph.

I usually try to make sure that the photograph is not subject to copyright. Once I post it on my server I add a link to the author acknowledging his work. In that case, I did exactly the same thing but I did not notice that the photograph had all its rights reserved. The author contacted me through an email. After a few minutes I saw that a high number of visits entered the article in question through the flickr forum.

I was curious and approached the forum and saw that the author warned of possible theft of images with my case as a clear example. I had copied a photograph with the rights reserved without realizing it and linked the author. I thought there was not enough to make such a stir, so I took part in the forum that was full of camera professionals. I took a few surprises and I must admit that I learned for the future. If you want to take a look at the chicken I got in, you can follow it through the flickr forum

The first thing I learned in this forum is that in the United States an image acquires its own license and registration at the time it was created. Regardless of whether the author subscribes it under a license or not, no one can use it without the word consent of the same author or an express creative commons license.

I know a few pages of travel or other media that extract their flickr images and do not even link to the author - thus avoiding the maximum number of outbound links - others do as I had done in this case: link to the author, but without see if the image has its rights reserved or not. You can see it on the right side of the medium height flickr menu. It is gray and not very noticeable to the user, although as I was told in the forum, that does not excuse the misuse of the image. Ignorance of the law does not justify the crime.

I deleted the picture and apologized. Fortunately everything ended well and at the end of the day I learned a new lesson.

Generally the photographs are shown with the license that the author designates and you can see it as commented in the right menu in gray.

Even so, there are many authors who allow the use of their images. You just have to be careful before selecting them. If you want to use Flickr photographs on your pages or blogs, I recommend that you previously carry out an advanced search. Through it you can select “search for images under a creative commons license.” Even so, that's not all. There is more than one creative commons license that I detail below:

Attribution: Allows other people to copy, distribute, display and reproduce the copyrighted work (and derivative works that are based on it), only if merit is recognized.

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